Anyother NY day with Gubatron

My friend Ian Walker told me he was recording some sort of film or documentary about his life to distribute it on the FrostWire network. I decided to give it a try with something shorter, so I grabbed my Cannon PowerShot SD110 (just a crappy 3.2mp photocamera that happens to shot video in 320×240), and a lot of enthusiasm to shoot a normal, random day in my life, which happened to be perfect for shooting this video cause the company I work for moved yesterday to a new place and there was no internet connection, therefore I have little or nothing to do…)

Turn up the Volume!!!

Turn up the Volume all the way, the music will be cool

Download in high resolution (Needs Quicktime or VLC with Quicktime codec Share it with Frostwire)

Anyways, this is just a test of what I can do with iMovie and a crappy cam, I already have over 20 minutes of footage of all Manhattan which I recorded a couple months ago, and I’m putting something much better for you guys to appreciate why I love New York.

Produced, Filmed, Edited and Distributed by Gubatron.

This video is licensed under the Creative Commons License, you can copy it and share it however you want as long as you don’t make a dime out of it, and as long as you give credit to Gubatron and wedoit4you.com

Donations are welcome by paypal, I need to buy a minidv cam, it’s just $350, it’d be cool if you could help me get half, just send paypal money to gubatron@gmail.com (Just in case that there’s a good soul out there who’ll give at least $1 for the entertainment)

LimeWire 4.12 Released! (And they moved my name further down on the credits)

Here’s the release post on the LimeWire Blog

Check out the credits of the software, I used to be on the Web Dev Team, my props to Andrew Fischler and best of luck to Dave Yeu, it’s great to be a web dev for such an exciting site, I’m sure you’ll learn a lot.

I’m thankful they kept me on the credits. Hi to Meghan Formel and Karl Magdsick who also moved on to other exciting projects, the best to you too.

Inspired by LimeWire’s owner, Mark Gorton, the LimeWire project is a collaborative open source effort involving programmers and researchers from all over the world. The collaborative nature of Gnutella is also reflected in the Gnutella Developers Forum (GDF), of which LimeWire is a participant. The members of the GDF work in the trenches every day to make Gnutella a truly innovative collection of protocols that is constantly improving — a testament to the power of open protocols and open standards.

LimeWire is also, of course, the result of the countless hours of work by LimeWire’s developers:
Greg Bildson
Sam Berlin
Zlatin Balevsky
Roger Kapsi
Mark Kornfilt
Akshay Kumar
Kevin Faaborg
Justin Schmidt
Tim Olsen
Felix Berger

Behind the scenes business strategy and day-to-day affairs are handled by LimeWire’s business developers:
Katie Catillaz
Rachel Sterne

Jesse Rubenfeld

The LimeWire web site and LimeWire graphic design are the hard work of LimeWire’s web team:
Andrew Fischler Jr.
Dave Yeu

LimeWire PRO questions are dutifully answered by LimeWire technical support:
Zenzele Bell
Kirk Kahn
Christine Cioffari

In addition, the following individuals have worked on the LimeWire team in the past but have since moved on to other projects:
Aubrey Arago
Susheel Daswani
Adam Fisk
Meghan Formel
Tarun Kapoor
Angel Leon (Me me me me!)
Karl Magdsick
Yusuke Naito
Dave Nicponski
Christine Nicponski
Christopher Rohrs
Anurag Singla
Robert Soule
Sumeet Thadani
Ron Vogl

LimeWire open source contributors have provided significant code and many bug fixes, ideas, research, etc. to the project as well. Those listed below have either written code that is distributed with every version of LimeWire, have identified serious bugs in the code, or both:
Richie Bielak
Jerry Charumilind
Marvin Chase
Robert Collins
Kenneth Corbin
David Graff
Andy Hedges
Michael Hirsch
Jens-Uwe Mager
Gordon Mohr
Chance Moore
Rick T. Piazza
Eugene Romanenko
Gregorio Roper
William Rucklidge
Phil Schalm
Eric Seidel
Philippe Verdy
Stephan Weber
Jason Winzenried

LimeWire would also like to thank the many contributors to the internationalization project, both for the application itself and for the LimeWire web site. Several colleagues in the Gnutella community merit special thanks. These include:
Vincent Falco — Free Peers, Inc.
Gordon Mohr — Bitzi, Inc.
John Marshall — Gnucleus
Jason Thomas — Swapper
Brander Lien — ToadNode
Angelo Sotira — www.gnutella.com
Marc Molinaro — www.gnutelliums.com
Simon Bellwood — www.gnutella.co.uk
Serguei Osokine
Justin Chapweske
Mike Green
Raphael Manfredi
Tor Klingberg
Mickael Prinkey
Sean Ediger
Kath Whittle
Finally, LimeWire would like to extend its sincere thanks to these developers, users, and all others who have contributed their ideas to the project. Without LimeWire users, the LimeWire network would not exist.

Hey Ian, you know what this means right?

Trac + SVN : The best shit ever for your software project

The company I came to work for knew I had some experience with subversion (back at LimeWire and with the migration of Frostwire’s CVS Repo no SourceForge.net to Subversion) so that’s one of the first things I did here.

Subversion is a pretty useful tool, specially if you play with the hooks, e.g., send emails to members of the teams on post-commit, or update a common sandbox on post-commit so that everyone can see how the trunk of your repository is at the moment (stable or not)…

But it’s not nearly as cool if you’re not using Trac to manage the project.

We needed a simple tool to handle Bug tracking, and this Tool has become my addiction ever since I finished configuring it, now I use it as a personal “post-it” tool, no more KDE Yellow post it notes (yeah, I quit a long time ago on the real post it notes), now I write everything down on Trac, and I pretty much have two geek addictions when it comes to work now:

  • Try to clean all my tickets
  • See how many commits and lines of code I added/removed throuout the day
  • The results are you’re being very productive and procastinate on crap like email, irc or IM.

    I stopped people comming to my desk, now they have to enter a ticket, and it seems people are liking the mix of svn+trac a lot. Even the graphic designers are using their command line on the macs to do their commits and we get all the diffs by mail. All this happened in like 3 weeks, pretty amazing acceptance to change where I work.

    but this post, is not to advertise or evangelize the tools I use for work (although so far I hope I got you pumped on using trac and subversion if you even know what I’m talking about), it’s to document how the hell I installed it.

    Installing trac was a painful process, I admit, and I’m still not done, just today I’m installing my first plugins, but so far, I have it set so that, we have ‘user accounts’, we can browse our repository and diffs through trac, and we can make references to revision changes on the wiki (cause yes, trac is also a wiki, so we’re also using it as our new intranet web page) just by putting something like ‘r35’ , and that will automatically make a link when you submit a ticket or save a wiki page to the diff on r35.

    So before you hate me, know in advanced something I hated.

    If you intend to use trac with subversion, trac must be on the same machine

    Yes, it still doesn’t support browsing a remote repository. So what did I do?

    I have a cronjob that rsyncs the repository every 5 minutes. You can also have it the other way if the server where the repository isn’t as loaded as ours, you can do the rsync to the machine where trac lives on the subversion hook for post-commit.

    So here is the entries I put on my apache2.conf on the machine that runs trac.

    #Mod python configuration
    SetHandler mod_python
    PythonHandler trac.web.modpython_frontend
    PythonOption TracEnv /var/www/trac_projects/flycell
    PythonOption TracUriRoot /trac/flycell

    #Authentication configuration
    AuthType Basic
    AuthName "Trac at Flycell.com"

    #Our password file
    AuthUserFile /var/www/trac_projects/flycell/conf/auth_file

    Require valid-user

    #Authentication configuration
    AuthType Basic
    AuthName "Trac at Flycell.com"

    #Our password file
    AuthUserFile /var/www/trac_projects/flycell/conf/auth_file

    Require valid-user

    DAV svn
    SVNPath /flycell_rsynced_svn

    And here’s what’s on my trac.ini

    [wiki]
    ignore_missing_pages = false

    [changeset]
    max_diff_bytes = 10000000
    wiki_format_messages = true
    max_diff_files = 0

    [logging]
    log_file = trac.log
    log_level = DEBUG
    log_type = stderr

    [trac]
    default_charset = iso-8859-15
    ignore_auth_case = false
    permission_store = DefaultPermissionStore
    check_auth_ip = true
    database = sqlite:db/trac.db
    authz_module_name =
    templates_dir = /usr/share/trac/templates
    default_handler = WikiModule
    base_url = http://192.168.208.230/trac/flycell
    metanav = login,logout,settings,help,about
    htdocs_location =
    mainnav = wiki,timeline,roadmap,browser,tickets,newticket,search
    repository_type = svn
    repository_dir = /flycell_rsynced_svn/trunk/1.0/
    authz_file = /var/www/trac_projects/flycell/conf/auth_file
    authz_module_name = flycell_svn_repo

    [project]
    url = http://192.168.208.230:8000
    icon = common/trac.ico
    name = Flycell.com
    descr = Flycell.com Project Management
    footer = Visit the Trac open source project at
    http://trac.edgewall.com/

    [notification]
    always_notify_owner = true
    smtp_always_cc = true
    smtp_password =
    smtp_enabled = true
    smtp_replyto =
    smtp_port = 25
    always_notify_reporter = true
    smtp_from = trac-do-not-reply@flycell.com
    smtp_server = mail.flycell.com
    smtp_always_bcc = me@flycell.com someone@flycell.com
    mime_encoding = base64
    maxheaderlen = 160
    use_public_cc = true
    smtp_user =

    [header_logo]
    src = http://www.flycell.com/template/shared/images/logo.gif
    alt =
    height = 63
    link = ./
    width = 157

    [mimeviewer]
    php_path = php
    enscript_path = enscript
    tab_width = 8
    max_preview_size = 262144

    [attachment]
    render_unsafe_content = false
    max_size = 262144

    [timeline]
    changeset_show_files = 0
    ticket_show_details = false
    default_daysback = 30
    changeset_long_messages = false

    [ticket]
    default_version =
    default_component = flycell.com
    default_type = defect
    restrict_owner = false
    default_milestone =
    default_priority = major

    [browser]
    hide_properties = svk:merge
    downloadable_paths = ['/trunk', '/branches/*', '/tags/*']

    That trac ini took a long time to figure out, specially for the subversion repository, until I found out It couldn’t work remotely, then I had permission problems that I finally resolved after hours and hours of googling that I had to have this at the end of my authz_file….


    [auth]
    usernameHere:z6unzMUVK6s.o
    anotherUserHere:dkajsl22dsjkl

    [flycell_svn_repo:/]
    * = rw

    The [auth] section of that file, contains users and crypted passwords created with

    htpasswd2 -nb username passwordhere

    I basically copied and pasted the output on that file, and that served as my .htpasswd file for a while, until I knew that It had to have the name of the repository there… as specified on the trac.ini

    They should make all this more clear, thank god there are other geeks like me who like to document stuff.

    Hope you find this post useful in the future if configuring trac.

    I’m not gonna cover how to install the plugins cause I’m not done yet with that, but it’s going smooth, just know that you’ll need to install a script before hand. I actually installed already the TracWebAdmin cause I need to give people access to the management of trac and I don’t want to have them on the console cause they’ll get lost.

    Enjoy

    Parkour/Tricking fever invades New York City

    I saw this yesterday in Central Park. Several groups of over 5-10 guys aged 16-20 something had gathered on one of the hughe rocks of central park and they were training jumps, stunts and acrobatics.

    After they practiced, they roamed through the park like a pack of wolves, wearing nothing but black shorts/black pants and snickers, they traversed the urban obstacles with Parkour/Tricking movements.

    (These are the guys practicing in central park, this one is about to do a frontal backflip)

    It’s nice to see how these new urban sports spread in big cities, I would say this social trends now travel faster thanks to kids publishing short flics on the internet.

    Check out a great sample of Parkour (It get’s good when the french rap soundtrack kicks in)

    Wikipedia defines Parkour as:

    Parkour (pron. IPA /paʁ.’kuʁ/, often abreviated to PK) is a physical discipline of French origin in which participants attempt to pass obstacles in the fastest and most direct manner possible, using skills such as jumping and climbing, or the more specific parkour moves. The obstacles can be anything in one’s environment, so parkour is often seen practiced in urban areas because of many suitable public structures that are accessible to most people, such as buildings, rails and walls.

    A traceur (/tʁa.’sœʁ/) is a participant of parkour.

    Tricking

    Now, there seems to be another similar trend called Tricking, defined in Wikipedia as:

    Tricking is a comparatively new sport with roots in different forms of Martial Arts and Gymnastics. According to Tricks Tutorials’ Jon Call “Tricking can be described as an aesthetic blend of flips, kicks, and twists.” Tricking can be viewed as martial arts power tumbling.

    Tricking has only recently come into its own as a recognised activity, although the various skills practiced have existed much longer and a variety of theories have been put forward as to where the term originated.

    It incorporates and variates moves from different arts such as the Backtuck from Gymnastics, 540 kick from Tae Kwon Do, Butterfly Twist from Wushu and Double Leg from Capoeira. In general, practitioners are capable of performing the majority of their tricks on grass, regular flooring or even concrete, without the requirement for mats or plyometric flooring.

    If you want to see a real good example of Parkour mixed with Tricking, See this video, from 3Run, a “Tricking” group from UK.

    Podcast #20 – Hasta Luego Bill :)

    Descarga el Mp4

    Wow, que noticia tan cargada de semana, digo, que semana tan cargada de noticias!!!

    Llegamos al episodio 20, y estamos super cargados de emocion y energias positivas para traerte lo ultimo en noticias de tecnologia esta semana del 11 de Junio hasta hoy 17 de Junio.

    En este episodio:

    Nuevos Blogs esta semana:

    • Votaguz.com (Desde Bogota, Colombia, Posicion 35, 155 visitas y 41 posts)
    • LaTati.com (Desde Miami, Florida, Posicion 71, 11 visitas y 5 posts)
    • TecnoBlog (Desde Chile, Posicion 66, 17 visitas, 12 posts)

    Musica para este episodio:
    Natasha Bedingfield – Unwritten

    Pass it around – Net neutrality

    As seen on hacker’s mailing lists all over the web.

    US plans to ‘fight the net’ revealed (2006-01)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4655196.stm

    From influencing public opinion through new media to designing
    “computer network attack” weapons, the US military is learning
    to fight an electronic war.
    The declassified document is called “Information Operations Roadmap”.

    Wrecking the Internet: Turning Gold into Lead (by Robert Storey 2006-05)
    http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20060508#opinion

    The COPE Act would do away with the requirement for net neutrality, thus
    turning America’s Internet into a “private network.” This would permit
    ISPs and telecom companies to dish out Internet access to the highest
    bidder. Under such a regime, AOL could, for example, block access to
    MSN, or Verizon could throttle your Skype bandwidth because it competes
    with their own voice-over-IP service. Even worse, a wealthy political
    party could pay ISPs to block access to a rival party’s web sites and
    blogs. Emailing lists could also be throttled. It’s not hard to imagine
    proprietary software companies paying to block access to DistroWatch, or
    prevent you from downloading the latest Ubuntu or Fedora release. […]

    Opposition to the COPE Act is being coordinated by Save the Internet.
    http://savetheinternet.com/

    The telecom/cable industry is pulling out all stops to polish this turd.
    Their “coalition” has the Orwellian title Hands Off the Internet – their
    thoroughly misleading web site can be found here.

    The telecoms have lots of cash, and are handing out campaign
    contributions (otherwise known as “bribes”) by the bucketful in order to
    get the COPE Act passed. Geeks of the world – especially US-based geeks
    – need to put down their cups of espresso for a moment and get busy
    fighting this thing. […]

    Kind regards Philippe

    http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20060508#opinion

    Not everyone realizes that the USA invented the Internet. Even fewer
    people realize that the USA is on the verge of wrecking it. This is not
    an exaggeration. Some nasty new legislation currently under debate in
    the US Congress could make the Internet as bland as day-old yogurt.

    Those who do not live in the USA should not be smug. There is a famous
    old saying that when America sneezes, the rest of the world catches
    pneumonia. The USA has a history of exporting its bad laws. Most geeks
    are familiar with the notorious DMCA and software patents. Thanks to the
    DMCA, DVDs are region-coded and it’s illegal to buy mod-chips for an
    Xbox. Thanks to software patents, most Linux distros do not have video
    codecs or an MP3 player. The fact that this execrable legislation
    originated in America did not prevent its rottenness from spreading
    around the world.

    To understand what is at stake, you should become familiar with the term
    net neutrality. The basic concept of net neutrality is that Internet
    content should be dished out in a non-discriminatory fashion. Thus, your
    ISP should not be preventing you from accessing DistroWatch, nor should
    your bandwidth be throttled when you try to use BitTorrent or Skype. In
    this sense, the network is neutral – it does not play favorites.

    All this would change (for USA residents) if the US Congress passes the
    Communications Opportunity, Promotion, and Enhancement (COPE) Act of
    2006. This odious new law is the brainchild of telecom and cable TV
    companies. Chief ogres include Verizon, Comcast, BellSouth and AT&T.
    Their incentive for pushing this legal abomination is the opportunity to
    make a lot of money.

    The COPE Act would do away with the requirement for net neutrality, thus
    turning America’s Internet into a “private network.” This would permit
    ISPs and telecom companies to dish out Internet access to the highest
    bidder. Under such a regime, AOL could, for example, block access to
    MSN, or Verizon could throttle your Skype bandwidth because it competes
    with their own voice-over-IP service. Even worse, a wealthy political
    party could pay ISPs to block access to a rival party’s web sites and
    blogs. Emailing lists could also be throttled. It’s not hard to imagine
    proprietary software companies paying to block access to DistroWatch, or
    prevent you from downloading the latest Ubuntu or Fedora release.

    COPE

    “If we fail, the Internet will deteriorate to the point of near
    uselessness.”

    If the COPE Act is passed, the USA – which likes to boast of being a
    “bastion of freedom” – could ironically wind up with an Internet
    befitting a Third World dictatorship. However, the damage would not be
    limited to residents of the USA. The fact is that about 50% of the
    content on the Internet originates in America, even more if you’re
    talking only about English-language content. Do a Google search on
    almost any topic – from “motorcycle repair” to “allergies” – and see how
    much of the hits are American-based web sites. The web sites themselves
    could be hosted on servers outside the USA, but server location is not
    the issue. Rather, deprived of their US-readership or US-based
    advertising revenue, many sites would have to fold. Would the Internet
    be as useful to you if Wikipedia or Google folded? For that matter, it’s
    hard to see how DistroWatch (which is not US-based) could survive if we
    lost our American audience and advertisers.

    There is a lot more I could write about on this topic, but there are
    others who have already done so (and do it better than me). Some
    excellent articles about this brewing fiasco appeared recently in The
    Nation, Raw Story and The Free Press. Sadly, I have seen nothing
    mentioned on the popular geek web sites that I visit everyday (which is
    why I’m writing this article).

    Can anything to done to prevent this disaster (especially since the COPE
    Act seems to have the support of the Bush administration)? Fortunately,
    in this case I believe there is hope, though it’s going to be a bitter
    fight. Although we are up against powerful, well-moneyed lobbyists from
    the telecom industry, we also have some heavyweight supporters, among
    them Amazon and Google. Opposition to the COPE Act is being coordinated
    by Save the Internet. If you are a US resident, you should visit their
    web site and sign their petition. Even more important, they also have a
    neat little form for sending a message to your representatives and
    senators – just type in your message, zip code and address, and it will
    get sent to the proper person (you needn’t even know who your
    representatives are). All such messages should be short and to the
    point. Basically, what I said in my message was:

    1. I oppose the Communications Opportunity, Promotion, and
    Enhancement (COPE) Act of 2006 in its present form.
    2. I support the efforts to amend the act by Representatives Markey,
    Boucher, Eshoo and Inslee, and Senators Olympia Snowe and Byron Dorgan.
    3. I am in favor of Net Neutrality.

    The telecom/cable industry is pulling out all stops to polish this turd.
    Their “coalition” has the Orwellian title Hands Off the Internet – their
    thoroughly misleading web site can be found here.

    The telecoms have lots of cash, and are handing out campaign
    contributions (otherwise known as “bribes”) by the bucketful in order to
    get the COPE Act passed. Geeks of the world – especially US-based geeks
    – need to put down their cups of espresso for a moment and get busy
    fighting this thing. If we fail, the Internet will deteriorate to the
    point of near uselessness and we might as well put our computers in
    storage. In that case, we’ll have to all find new hobbies. Possible
    candidates include knitting and flower arranging.