[SYSADMIN] Serve your WordPress cached pages directly with lighttpd and not PHP

Optimizing Your WordPress Cache Loads in Lighttpd.

If you don’t configure your wordpress virtual host properly in lighttpd, your wordpress cache will still make use of PHP.

Wouldn’t it be nice if all those cached requests were served directy from the webserver as the static files that they are, bypassing the CPU/memory load PHP can have, and use those resources for otherthings?

Install and Enable mod_magnet

For this to occur with lighttpd, you will need mod_magnet, so assuming you’re on a Ubuntu/Debian based linux distro let’s make sure we have it installed.

sudo apt-get install lighttpd-mod-magnet

Then let’s make sure it’s enabled, you can do this manually on your lighttpd.conf by adding “mod_magnet” to the list of enabled modules…

server.modules = (
        "mod_fastcgi",
        "mod_access",
        "mod_alias",
        "mod_accesslog",
        "mod_compress",
        "mod_rewrite",
        "mod_redirect",
        "mod_status",
        "mod_proxy",
        "mod_setenv",
        "mod_magnet"
)

or you can do it the lighty way:

sudo lighty-enable-mod magnet

(this simply makes a symlink to the 10-magnet.conf file inside /etc/lighttpd/conf-enabled which lighty will check upon startup)

The cache logic script that will be executed by lighttpd

Now, on your wordpress directory, create a file called rewrite.lua and paste the following script in it:

function log(str)
   -- wanna tail -f a log to see what's happening    
   fp = io.open("/path/to/some/lua.log","a+")
   fp:write(str .. "\n")
   fp:flush()
   fp:close()
end

function serve_html(cached_page)
    if (lighty.stat(cached_page)) then
        lighty.env["physical.path"] = cached_page
        return true
    else
        return false
    end
end

function serve_gzip(cached_page)
    if (lighty.stat(cached_page .. ".gz")) then
        lighty.header["Content-Encoding"] = "gzip"
        lighty.header["Content-Type"] = ""
        lighty.env["physical.path"] = cached_page .. ".gz"
        return true
    else
        return false
    end
end

if (lighty.env["uri.scheme"] == "http") then
    ext = ".html"
else
    ext = "-https.html"
end

cached_page = lighty.env["physical.doc-root"] .. "/wp-content/cache/supercache/" .. lighty.request["Host"] .. lighty.env["request.orig-uri"]
cached_page = string.gsub(cached_page, "//", "/")
cached_page = string.gsub(cached_page, lighty.request["Host"] .. "/index.php", lighty.request["Host"])

attr = lighty.stat(cached_page)

if (attr) then
    query_condition = not (lighty.env["uri.query"] and string.find(lighty.env["uri.query"], ".*s=.*"))
    user_cookie = lighty.request["Cookie"] or "no_cookie_here"
    cookie_condition = not (string.find(user_cookie, ".*comment_author.*") or (string.find(user_cookie, ".*wordpress.*") and not string.find(user_cookie,"wordpress_test_cookie")))

    if (query_condition and cookie_condition) then
        accept_encoding = lighty.request["Accept-Encoding"] or "no_acceptance"

        if (string.find(accept_encoding, "gzip")) then
            if not serve_gzip(cached_page) then 
                serve_html(cached_page) 
            end
        else
            serve_html(cached_page)
        end
        --log('cache-hit: ' .. cached_page)
    end
else
    --log('cache-miss: ' .. cached_page)
end

Configuring your vhost in lighttpd for WordPress redirects and direct cache serves without php.

Then on your vhost configuration in lighttpd.conf add the following towards the end.
(Fix paths if you have to)

var.wp_blog = 1

magnet.attract-physical-path-to = ( server.document-root + "/rewrite.lua" )

url.rewrite-if-not-file = (
   "^/(wp-.+).*/?" => "$0",
   "^/(sitemap.xml)" => "$0",
   "^/(xmlrpc.php)" => "$0",
   "^/(.+)/?$" => "/index.php/$1"
  )

Restart your lighttpd sudo service lighttpd restart

Now watch how your PHP processes breathe a lot better and you page loads are insanely faster.

You’re welcome 🙂

How to have a Play framework app autostart during boot on Elastic Beanstalk CentOS ec2 instances

So you’ve created an Elastic Beanstalk environment, you have a play framework distribution which you’ve created using play dist (either on your local environment, or right there on the server, whatever you prefer)

play dist outputs a my-app-1.0.zip file which has a self-contained version of your app with all the necessary libraries and a start script.

Afer you unzip it, you end up with a my-app-1.0/lib/ folder and a start script.

[ec2-user@ip-10-235-8-106 bullq-1.0]$ ls -l
total 24
drwxrwxr-x 2 ec2-user ec2-user 4096 Sep 27 15:35 lib
-rwxrwxr-x 1 ec2-user ec2-user 4328 Sep 27 15:35 start

Make sure it’s executable by using chmod +x start on the start script.

So now, this is all in the first ec2 instance of your elastic beanstalk environment, if you’re like me and you’ve used ubuntu/debian for your server management things can be slightly different here, since Amazon preferred CentOS for their default image, and here I’ll show you how to make your play app auto start when the server boots because you want every new machine that may be instanciated to have your app installed and to start the service as soon as the machine is up.

Create a /etc/init.d/myappd script
(I’m using ‘myapp’ here as an example, your app can be named whatever is named, so replace accordingly)

#!/usr/bin/env bash
#myappd
#Script to start|stop|restart myappd from /etc/init.d/
#By Gubatron – @gubatron – gubatron@gmail.com

#replace accordingly in these variables ‘myapp’ for the name of your app
PID_FILE=/home/ec2-user/myapp/dist/myapp-1.0/RUNNING_PID
DAEMON_NAME=myappd
DAEMON_PATH=/home/ec2-user/myapp
DAEMON=$DAEMON_PATH/dist/myapp-1.0/start

test -x $DAEMON || exit 0

set -e

function killDAEMON() {
echo “start kill daemon”
kill -9 cat /home/ec2-user/bullq/dist/bullq-1.0/RUNNING_PID
echo “end kill daemon”
}

function removePIDFile() {
if [ -e $PID_FILE ]
then
rm -f $PID_FILE
fi
}

case $1 in
start)
removePIDFile
echo “Starting $DAEMON_NAME… $DAEMON”
nohup $DAEMON &
;;
restart)
echo “Hot restart of $DAEMON_NAME”
killDAEMON
removePIDFile
COMMAND=”nohup $DAEMON &”;
echo $COMMAND
$COMMAND
rm -f $PID_FILE
;;
stop)
echo “Stopping $DAEMON_NAME”
killDAEMON
removePIDFile
;;
*)
echo “Usage: $DAEMON_NAME {start|restart|stop}” >&2
exit 1
;;
esac

exit 0

 

Wire it to autostart

The simplest way I found to have this script start when the server would boot was to add it at the end of the
/etc/rc.local file. (In ubuntu you’d register the new script with the upate-rc.d command)

#!/bin/sh
#
This script will be executed after all the other init scripts.
You can put your own initialization stuff in here if you don’t
want to do the full Sys V style init stuff.

touch /var/lock/subsys/local

/etc/init.d/myappd start

 

lighttpd, allow “Access-Control-Allow-Origin:*” headers on the server status page

Maybe there’s someone out there who needs to read the output of lighttpd’s status for monitoring purpose like me tonight, and also, like me, you want to do this using JavaScript, but your browser gives you this nasty error:

XMLHttpRequest cannot load http://otherSubdomain.server.com/lighttpd-status-url-you-have-configured. Origin http://requestingSubdomain.server.com is not allowed by Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

lighttpd allows you to add a custom header for all requests by adding this in a given context:

[perl]setenv.add-response-header = ( "Access-Control-Allow-Origin" => "*" )[/perl]

For this to work, you must enable the mod_setenv.

But if you don’t enable this module, before you enable your mod_status module, you will never see the custom headers come out of your lighttpd HTTP response header output.

So make sure you enable mod_setenv like this:

[perl]
server.modules = (
"mod_fastcgi",
"mod_auth",
"mod_access",
"mod_alias",
"mod_accesslog",
# "mod_simple_vhost",
"mod_rewrite",
"mod_redirect",
"mod_setenv", #before mod_status, very important!
"mod_status",
# "mod_evhost",
"mod_compress",

[/perl]

The header output of your lighttpd status page should look like this now:

[bash]
Access-Control-Allow-Origin:*
Content-Length:5952
Content-Type:text/html
Date:Wed, 30 Nov 2011 01:27:04 GMT
Server:lighttpd/1.4.28
[/bash]

Hope this helps you.