Blooploader 0.6 is Hardy compatible


Blooploader 0.6 running on Hardy. Currently available only via subversion.

For our Linux users, you can safely update to Ubuntu Hardy if the one thing holding your breath was compatibility with the Blooploader.

Currently we run the Blooploader in Linux from source, you just need to have installed, Qt4, sip4, and PyQt4 on your machine. If you are an Ubuntu user this translates to:

  1. Checking out the source from our subversion repository
  2. sudo apt-get install python-sip4 python-qt4 python-qt-4-common
  3. ./run

For those of you that want to try the Blooploader in Ubuntu, and you have no clue on how to use the command line, we promise we’ll have a new .deb installer for our next release now that Hardy has enabled binary packages on their repository for all our dependencies.

[Poll/Bet] What version control system do you use?

About Version Control

Source: wikipedia.org

Revision Control (also known as version control (system) (VCS), source control or (source) code management (SCM)) is the management of multiple revisions of the same unit of information. It is most commonly used in engineering and software development to manage ongoing development of digital documents like application source code, art resources such as blueprints or electronic models, and other critical information that may be worked on by a team of people. Changes to these documents are usually identified by incrementing an associated number or letter code, termed the “revision number”, “revision level”, or simply “revision” and associated historically with the person making the change. A simple form of revision control, for example, has the initial issue of a drawing assigned the revision number “1”. When the first change is made, the revision number is incremented to “2” and so on.

Some Version Control systems
I’ve only mentioned the most popular ones I’ve seen during my career, but I know there’s tons of commercial revision control systems that are supposed to be great, however, these ones do the job, are free, and lots of developers know how to use them.

My favorite one is subversion (having used CVS) in the past.

Here are links to all these projects: